School improvement

The Local Authority Strategy for School Improvement has been updated following consultation with head teachers.

What we're doing

Salford’s strategy for school improvement sits at the heart of our plans to create a prosperous city in which people want to live, work and study. Our 0-25 partnership strategy for the city, overseen by the 0-25 Advisory Board, aspires that all children and young people will achieve their full potential. To achieve this, the 0-25 strategy has the following priorities for our children and young people:

  • They are as healthy and safe as possible
  • Achieve the best education outcomes they can
  • Be as well equipped for adult life as they can be
  • Have a sense of belonging and value
  • Have aspirations and opportunities to achieve them

Over the next three years we want to:

  • Raise standards in all schools so that attainment and progress measures at all key stages are improving or are at least in line with or exceed national averages, improving achievement for all groups of pupils, particularly those who achieve less well than their peers, particularly those who are most disadvantaged and those with Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities (SEND)  to enable them to achieve their full potential
  • Increase proportion of schools overall being judged as good or better from 81% to 86% to bring Salford in line with the best of our statistical neighbours
    • Increase the proportion of  primary schools  judged as good or better from 86% to 93%
    • Increase the proportion of  secondary schools  judged as good or better from 53% to 71%
    • Increase the proportion of  special schools  judged as good or better from 75% to 100%
    • Maintain the proportion of Pupil Referral units judged as good or better as 100%
  • Have no primary schools or secondary schools or settings judged as inadequate (currently 2%) 

Downloadable documents

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This page was last updated on 20 December 2019

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